Suicide Prevention Tips

Suicide Prevention Tips

Suicide is a tragedy. Instances of suicide have expanded rapidly in today’s society. Today, every 90 minutes, a young person dies of suicide and 15-25 others attempt suicide. In fact, the WHO estimates that 1 million deaths per year are attributable to suicide. The cost on society is devastating, especially since this tragedy is preventable. Fortunately, there are tools available, such as suicide awareness workshops Chicago IL, where you can learn suicide prevention tips.

Learn

Your first action may be to learn more about suicide, including who is most vulnerable and the factors that encourage suicide attempts. You should also learn how to recognize when a person is vulnerable.

Listen

Everyone has heard that those who talk about suicide won’t take their own lives, but this is not the case. In fact, many people talk about taking their own lives in one way or another before they do. For example, they may talk about how hopeless they are and that they don’t see a way out. They may also reference your feelings when they are gone. These are warning statements.

Observe  

Watch those around you. Do they actively engage with others, or do they set themselves apart? Look for individuals who have lost someone they love and are drowning in grief. Depression and emotional pain are also triggers. Some people are good at hiding their depression through false positivity, so search out signs of depression. Also, look for physical warning signs, such as self-inflicted cuts or burns.

Act

Many have said that nothing can stop a person who is determined to commit suicide. However, sometimes, a kind word or action can prevent this tragedy. These individuals may feel like they are drowning and that the pain will never stop. Taking the individual to a qualified professional or notifying such a professional about your concerns can help. Many of these individuals just don’t know where to go to find help or may have not sought the right help.

Also, be willing to speak about suicide openly and without judgment. Ask direct questions, such as whether individuals you know are thinking about hurting or killing themselves.

If you think someone you know may consider committing suicide, be kind and support them as they seek help.

Categories: Health

About Author

Alen Graham

Allan Graham is a biology graduate and is interested in health related areas. He has written several articles for many eminent health magazines.

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